Tourist Adds Hanford to Life List

There are so many things to see in the world. Mountains, monuments…and hazardous nuclear energy sites. Tri-Cities correspondent Carol Cizauskas profiles a retired engineer who spends his time and money visiting scientific facilities, including Hanford.

Schaffter: “You know, you think about, well, we’re trying to keep Iran from getting nuclear weapons. We did this many, many years ago, and we didn’t have computers that Iran has now, that sort of thing, and it’s kind of interesting to see how fragile this world really is.”
Craig Schaffter is a retired engineer who tours of places of scientific interest in the U.S.
Hanford tour

Original Hanford safety warning. PHOTO BY CAROL CIZAUSKAS

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Hidden Hanford History

World War II spawned the first major African-American migration to the Northwest. Blacks came to the Hanford nuclear site for jobs to help make plutonium for the atom bomb. But their past followed them, a past of segregation and discrimination. Carol Cizauskas brings us the story of one African-American family in the Tri-Cities then…and now…

Bauman: “He was tied to a telephone pole in Kennewick, in downtown Kennewick, until the Pasco police came to pick him up. That sort of scene, of a black man tied to a pole, is the sort of visual image that we generally associate with the South.”
Bob Bauman, a history professor at Washington State University, describes what happened when an African American was arrested for riding in a car with two white friends during the years of segregation and discrimination in the Tri-Cities, Washington.

 

Hidden Hanford history


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