Summer Program Feeds Poor Children

Public schools are for education. For low-income families, they’re also a source of child care and meals. But what happens in the summer, when children in poverty might be left alone while their parents work? Correspondent Carol Cizauskas visited White Swan in south-central Washington to look at a program that bridges the summertime gap.

Bell: “They’re probably of the poorest children and families in the area, especially out in White Swan. I mean, you’re out as far and as rural as you could possibly be. We have a lot of farm workers, and a lot of times they aren’t even making minimum wage, and they work very, very long hours. Parents work six days a week.”
Belinda Bell runs a summer program for five dozen children from the community of White Swan. The social worker started the project at the Yakama Christian Mission eight years ago.

 

Summer program

Yakama Christian mission summer program sign
PHOTO BY CAROL CIZAUSKAS


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Broadcast on Northwest News Network.

Tourist Adds Hanford to Life List

There are so many things to see in the world. Mountains, monuments…and hazardous nuclear energy sites. Tri-Cities correspondent Carol Cizauskas profiles a retired engineer who spends his time and money visiting scientific facilities, including Hanford.

Schaffter: “You know, you think about, well, we’re trying to keep Iran from getting nuclear weapons. We did this many, many years ago, and we didn’t have computers that Iran has now, that sort of thing, and it’s kind of interesting to see how fragile this world really is.”
Craig Schaffter is a retired engineer who tours of places of scientific interest in the U.S.
Hanford tour

Original Hanford safety warning. PHOTO BY CAROL CIZAUSKAS

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Broadcast on Northwest News Network.

Northwest Land Rush to Build Wind Farms

There’s a new crop growing in the fields of eastern Washington and Oregon. It’s wind turbines. Eight years ago, there wasn’t a single wind farm in the Northwest. Today, enough turbines are operating and under construction to power about three hundred fifty thousand homes. Correspondent Carol Cizauskas visited a new wind farm in central Washington, and reports on the state of wind energy in the Northwest.

Garrett: “People learned today when they went out to actually tour the Wild Horse project and see how big these things are. And just imagine if you had to have fifteen of those put across the street from you and you think you can live with it.”
Ed Garrett is part of a group of homeowners fighting the installation of a wind farm in their location.
Wild Horse wind turbine

Wild Horse wind turbine
PHOTO BY CAROL CIZAUSKAS


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Broadcast on Northwest News Network.

Hidden Hanford History

World War II spawned the first major African-American migration to the Northwest. Blacks came to the Hanford nuclear site for jobs to help make plutonium for the atom bomb. But their past followed them, a past of segregation and discrimination. Carol Cizauskas brings us the story of one African-American family in the Tri-Cities then…and now…

Bauman: “He was tied to a telephone pole in Kennewick, in downtown Kennewick, until the Pasco police came to pick him up. That sort of scene, of a black man tied to a pole, is the sort of visual image that we generally associate with the South.”
Bob Bauman, a history professor at Washington State University, describes what happened when an African American was arrested for riding in a car with two white friends during the years of segregation and discrimination in the Tri-Cities, Washington.

 

Hidden Hanford history


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Broadcast on Northwest News Network.

Silent night

Nevadans speak against George Bush’s war while his prestige and polls decline.

One man said, “This is the first time since the end of the Vietnam War that I’ve been embarrassed to be an American because we … have already engaged in preemptive war to countries that were no threat to us, and also the fact that now we’re debating torture, and we’re becoming as low as the people that we’re fighting. … I can’t believe it.”
Silent night

Paula McDonough (left), Lisa Stiller (center) and Ellen Pillard held candles at the Brick Park protest against the war.
PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT


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Published in Reno News & Review

Left at home

Long a bastion of conservatives, Reno homeschooling now has an organization of liberal parents.

Several people were discussing their 14-year-olds beginning high school. When asked where she was going to attend high school, Mayorga’s daughter said she is homeschooled. The group grew silent. “One of the ladies that was in the group [whispered to me], ‘She looks so normal,” Mayorga recounted, “without even thinking that she’d said anything wrong.”
Heather Mayorga, a member of Liberal Home Schoolers in Northern Nevada
Parent Jenna Hathaway Ewart teaches her children Arran, 8, and Alana, 6, at their home. Aladdin the cat looks on.  PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT

Parent Jenna Hathaway Ewart teaches her children Arran, 8, and Alana, 6, at their home. Aladdin the cat looks on.
PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT

 


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Published in Reno News & Review

The new red menace?

If openness is sacrificed in the battle against terrorism, have the terrorists won?

“The more I see of this homeland security/PATRIOT Act/anti-terrorism movement, the more I see it as creeping fascism. … If we change the way we live and become more fearful and become less free, they’ve won already—and they’re already winning because we’re defeating ourselves.”
Frank Mullen, panelist and longtime investigative reporter for the Reno Gazette-Journal
panel discussion on cyber-security from terrorism

At an auditorium in Sierra Pacific’s headquarters, advocates argued the pros and cons of openness in government.
PHOTO BY DENNIS MYERS


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Published in Reno News & Review

Caring facility

A growing Reno-Sparks Indian Colony prepares for a larger health clinic.

“Over the years, they’ve added on and added on and added on,” Dressler said. She’s watched the overcrowding grow during her 12 years working at the clinic. “And now we’re patching. Our roof is not good. Our electrical systems are patched together. And so we constantly go in and fix what we can to keep things right. By having a new clinic, it’s just going to be wonderful for the patients and the staff that work here.”
Marge Dressler, nurse supervisor for the health center
Indian clinic

Nurse Francis Shaw examines patient Nettie Velasquez at the Reno Indian Colony’s health clinic, which will soon be moving to new quarters.
PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT


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Published in Reno News & Review

Public broadcasting deserves life

Recently, I held my breath as, once again, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting struggled to survive while Congress debated its value.

“Conservatives often argue that public broadcasting skews left, yet studies show the opposite. If anything, NPR leans more than halfway to the right in the numbers of conservative experts it interviews, think tanks it contacts, and politicians it covers.”
Carol Cizauskas, public radio journalist and commenter
Carol Cizauskas

Carol Cizauskas is a Reno public-radio journalist.
PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT


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Published in Reno News & Review