Silent night

Nevadans speak against George Bush’s war while his prestige and polls decline.

One man said, “This is the first time since the end of the Vietnam War that I’ve been embarrassed to be an American because we … have already engaged in preemptive war to countries that were no threat to us, and also the fact that now we’re debating torture, and we’re becoming as low as the people that we’re fighting. … I can’t believe it.”
Silent night

Paula McDonough (left), Lisa Stiller (center) and Ellen Pillard held candles at the Brick Park protest against the war.
PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT


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Published in Reno News & Review

Left at home

Long a bastion of conservatives, Reno homeschooling now has an organization of liberal parents.

Several people were discussing their 14-year-olds beginning high school. When asked where she was going to attend high school, Mayorga’s daughter said she is homeschooled. The group grew silent. “One of the ladies that was in the group [whispered to me], ‘She looks so normal,” Mayorga recounted, “without even thinking that she’d said anything wrong.”
Heather Mayorga, a member of Liberal Home Schoolers in Northern Nevada
Parent Jenna Hathaway Ewart teaches her children Arran, 8, and Alana, 6, at their home. Aladdin the cat looks on.  PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT

Parent Jenna Hathaway Ewart teaches her children Arran, 8, and Alana, 6, at their home. Aladdin the cat looks on.
PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT

 


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Published in Reno News & Review

The new red menace?

If openness is sacrificed in the battle against terrorism, have the terrorists won?

“The more I see of this homeland security/PATRIOT Act/anti-terrorism movement, the more I see it as creeping fascism. … If we change the way we live and become more fearful and become less free, they’ve won already—and they’re already winning because we’re defeating ourselves.”
Frank Mullen, panelist and longtime investigative reporter for the Reno Gazette-Journal
panel discussion on cyber-security from terrorism

At an auditorium in Sierra Pacific’s headquarters, advocates argued the pros and cons of openness in government.
PHOTO BY DENNIS MYERS


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Caring facility

A growing Reno-Sparks Indian Colony prepares for a larger health clinic.

“Over the years, they’ve added on and added on and added on,” Dressler said. She’s watched the overcrowding grow during her 12 years working at the clinic. “And now we’re patching. Our roof is not good. Our electrical systems are patched together. And so we constantly go in and fix what we can to keep things right. By having a new clinic, it’s just going to be wonderful for the patients and the staff that work here.”
Marge Dressler, nurse supervisor for the health center
Indian clinic

Nurse Francis Shaw examines patient Nettie Velasquez at the Reno Indian Colony’s health clinic, which will soon be moving to new quarters.
PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT


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Public broadcasting deserves life

Recently, I held my breath as, once again, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting struggled to survive while Congress debated its value.

“Conservatives often argue that public broadcasting skews left, yet studies show the opposite. If anything, NPR leans more than halfway to the right in the numbers of conservative experts it interviews, think tanks it contacts, and politicians it covers.”
Carol Cizauskas, public radio journalist and commenter
Carol Cizauskas

Carol Cizauskas is a Reno public-radio journalist.
PHOTO BY DAVID ROBERT


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Published in Reno News & Review